Cedar Waxwing Eating Mulberry

Cedar Waxwing Eating Mulberry - Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge - Oklahoma

Cedar Waxwing Eating Mulberry - Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge - Oklahoma

I photographed this Cedar Waxwing in a Mulberry tree at the Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge in Oklahoma. This refuge has several Mulberry trees and during this time of year you can see all types of birds eating the Mulberries.

The cedar waxwing eats berries and sugary fruit year-round, including "dogwood, serviceberry, cedar, juniper, hawthorn, and winterberry", with insects becoming an important part of the diet in the breeding season. Its fondness for the small cones of the eastern redcedar (a kind of juniper) gave this bird its common name. They eat berries whole.

Outside the breeding season, cedar waxwings often feed in large flocks numbering hundreds of birds. They are non-territorial birds and "will often groom each other." They move from place to place depending on where they can find good sources of berries. (Wikipedia)

How I Got The Shot - Cedar Waxwing

I have one spot I like to go to at the Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge when the Mulberries ripen. This spot is located west of the 4 corners intersection in the middle of the S curve. It is on the west side of the tour road. Two Mulberry trees are located here and since they are on the west side of the road, mornings are the best time to photograph the birds feeding on the berries.

I had my Canon EOS 7D Mark II camera resting on a bean bag draped over the open window of my pickup. I was using a Canon EF 100 - 400 mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II lens. I was shooting in aperture priority mode (AV) with a shutter speed of 1/3200 of a second at f5.6 and the ISO at 800. White Balance was set on auto. I was using single point, continuous auto focus with evaluative metering.